How Children Succeed

How Children Succeed Author Paul Tough
ISBN-10 9781448165445
Release 2013-01-25
Pages 256
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Why character, confidence, and curiosity are more important to your child’s success than academic results. The New York Times bestseller. For all fans of Oliver James or Steve Biddulph’s Raising Boys, Raising Girls, and The Complete Secrets of Happy Children. In a world where academic success can seem all-important in deciding our children’s success in adult life, Paul Tough sees things very differently. Instead of fixating on grades and exams, he argues that we, as parents, should be paying more attention to our children’s characters. Inner resilience, a sense of curiosity, the hidden power of confidence - these are the most important things we can teach our children, because it is these qualities that will enable them to live happy, fulfilled and successful lives. In this personal, thought-provoking and timely book, Paul Tough offers a clarion call to parents who are seeking to unlock their child’s true potential – and ensure they really succeed.



How Children Succeed in 30 Minutes

How Children Succeed    in 30 Minutes Author
ISBN-10 9781623150570
Release 2012-11-29
Pages
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How Children Succeed ...in 30 minutes is the essential guide to quickly understanding the important lessons outlined in Paul Tough's bestselling book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character. Understand the key ideas behind How Children Succeed in a fraction of the time: • 18 essential insights and takeaways‬ • 8 illustrative case studies • 5 chapter-by-chapter synopses In How Children Succeed, bestselling author Paul Tough examines the research of neuroscientists, medical doctors, psychologists, educators, and economists to discover the qualities that lead to successful children and, ultimately, successful adults. An essential read for parents, social workers, educators, and politicians, How Children Succeed stresses the importance of noncognitive skills and concludes that developing a child's character strengths—grit, self-control, zest, social intelligence, gratitude, optimism, and curiosity—is the most powerful tool in helping children reach for success. A 30 Minute Expert Summary of How Children Succeed Designed for those whose desire to learn exceeds the time they have available, the How Children Succeed summary helps readers quickly and easily become experts ...in 30 minutes.



GRIT Die neue Formel zum Erfolg

GRIT   Die neue Formel zum Erfolg Author Angela Duckworth
ISBN-10 9783641173555
Release 2017-03-20
Pages 480
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Die neue Formel zum Erfolg: Leidenschaft Ausdauer und Zuversicht Eine Mischung aus Ausdauer und Leidenschaft, nicht IQ, Startbedingungen oder Talent entscheidet über den Erfolg eines Menschen. Diese These hat die Neurowissenschaftlerin und Psychologin Angela Duckworth in dem Wort GRIT zusammengefasst, das im Englischen so viel wie Biss oder Mumm heißt, und hat damit weltweit Aufsehen erregt. Auf Basis ihrer eigenen Geschichte, von wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen und anhand ungewöhnlicher Leistungsbiografien ist sie dem Geheimnis von erfolgreichen Menschen auf den Grund gegangen, seien sie Sportler, Bankmanager oder Comiczeichner. Sie weist nach, dass nicht "Genie", sondern eine einzigartige Kombination aus Begeisterungsfähigkeit und langfristigem Durchhaltevermögen darüber entscheidet, ob man seine Ziele erreicht. Mit zahlreichen Beispielen, die jeder auf seine Situation anwenden kann, erläutert Angela Duckworth das Konzept der motivierten Beharrlichkeit. Und sie fordert dazu auf, im Wissen um GRIT Lernen und Bildung neu zu denken.



How Children Succeed

How Children Succeed Author Hamzer akyuz
ISBN-10
Release 2012-09-04
Pages
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Why do some children succeed while others fail? The story we usually tell about childhood and success is the one about intelligence: success comes to those who score highest on tests, from preschool admissions to SATs. But in How Children Succeed, Paul Tough argues that the qualities that matter most have more to do with character: skills like perseverance, curiosity, conscientiousness, optimism, and self-control. How Children Succeed introduces us to a new generation of researchers and educators who, for the first time, are using the tools of science to peel back the mysteries of character. Through their stories—and the stories of the children they are trying to help—Tough traces the links between childhood stress and life success. He uncovers the surprising ways in which parents do—and do not—prepare their children for adulthood. And he provides us with new insights into how to help children growing up in poverty. Early adversity, scientists have come to understand, can not only affect the conditions of children’s lives, it can alter the physical development of their brains as well. But now educators and doctors around the country are using that knowledge to develop innovative interventions that allow children to overcome the constraints of poverty. And with the help of these new strategies, as Tough’s extraordinary reporting makes clear, children who grow up in the most painful circumstances can go on to achieve amazing things. This provocative and profoundly hopeful book has the potential to change how we raise our children, how we run our schools, and how we construct our social safety net. It will not only inspire and engage readers, it will also change our understanding of childhood itself. Amazon.com Review Q&A with Paul Tough Q. What made you want to write How Children Succeed? A. In 2008, I published my first book, Whatever It Takes, about Geoffrey Canada and the Harlem Children’s Zone. I spent five years reporting that book, but when I finished it, I realized I still had a lot of questions about what really happens in childhood. How Children Succeed is an attempt to answer those questions, which for many of us are big and mysterious and central in our lives: Why do certain children succeed while other children fail? Why is it, exactly, that poor children are less likely to succeed, on average, than middle-class children? And most important, what can we all do to steer more kids toward success? Q. Where did you go to find the answers? A. My reporting for this book took me all over the country, from a pediatric clinic in a low-income San Francisco neighborhood to a chess tournament in central Ohio to a wealthy private school in New York City. And what I found as I reported was that there is a new and groundbreaking conversation going on, out of the public eye, about childhood and success and failure. It is very different than the traditional education debate. There are economists working on this, neuroscientists, psychologists, medical doctors. They are often working independently from one another. They don’t always coordinate their efforts. But they’re beginning to find some common ground, and together they’re reaching some interesting and important conclusions. Q. A lot of your reporting for this book was in low-income neighborhoods. Overall, what did you learn about kids growing up in poverty? A. A lot of what we think we know about the effect of poverty on a child’s development is just plain wrong. It’s certainly indisputable that growing up in poverty is really hard on children. But the conventional wisdom is that the big problem for low-income kids is that they don’t get enough cognitive stimulation early on. In fact, what seems to have more of an effect is the chaotic environments that many low-income kids grow up in and the often stressful relationships they have with the adults around them. That makes a huge difference in how children’s brains develop, and scientists are now able to trace a direct route from those early negative experiences to later problems in school, health, and behavior. The problem is that science isn’t yet reflected in the way we run our schools and operate our social safety net. And that’s a big part of why so many low-income kids don’t do well in school. We now know better than ever what kind of help they need to succeed in school. But very few schools are equipped to deliver that help. Q. Many readers were first exposed to your reporting on character through your article in the New York Times Magazine in September 2011, which was titled "What If the Secret to Success Is Failure?" How does failure help us succeed? A. That’s an idea that I think was best expressed by Dominic Randolph, the head of the Riverdale Country School, an exclusive private school in the Bronx where they’re now doing some interesting experiments with teaching character. Here’s how he put it: "The idea of building grit and building self-control is that you get that through failure. And in most highly academic environments in the United States, no one fails anything." That idea resonated with a lot of readers. I don’t think it’s quite true that failure itself helps us succeed. In fact, repeated failures can be quite devastating to a child’s development. What I think is important on the road to success is learning to deal with failure, to manage adversity. That’s a skill that parents can certainly help their children develop--but so can teachers and coaches and mentors and neighbors and lots of other people. Q. How did writing this book affect you as a parent? A. My wife and I became parents for the first time just as I started reporting this book, and our son Ellington is now three. Those are crucial years in a child’s development, and I spent a lot of them reading papers on the infant brain and studies on attachment and trauma and stress hormones, trying not to get too overwhelmed. In the end, though, this research had a surprising effect: it made me more relaxed as a parent. When Ellington was born, I was very much caught up in the idea of childhood as a race--the faster a child develops skills, the better he does on tests, the better he’ll do in life. Having done this reporting, I’m less concerned about my son’s reading and counting ability. Don’t get me wrong, I still want him to know that stuff. But I think he’ll get there in time. What I’m more concerned about is his character--or whatever the right synonym is for character when you’re talking about a three-year-old. I want him to be able to get over disappointments, to calm himself down, to keep working at a puzzle even when it’s frustrating, to be good at sharing, to feel loved and confident and full of a sense of belonging. Most important, I want him to be able to deal with failure. That’s a difficult thing for parents to give their children, since we have deep in our DNA the urge to shield our kids from every kind of trouble. But what we’re finding out now is that in trying to protect our children, we may actually be harming them. By not giving them the chance to learn to manage adversity, to cope with failure, we produce kids who have real problems when they grow up. Overcoming adversity is what produces character. And character, even more than IQ, is what leads to real and lasting success. From Booklist Starred Review Debunking the conventional wisdom of the past few decades that disadvantaged children need to develop basic reading and counting skills before entering school, Tough argues that they would be better served by learning such skills as grit, conscientiousness, curiosity, and optimism. It boils down to a debate about precognitive versus noncognitive skills of self-regulation or, simply put, character. Tough (Whatever It Takes, 2008) spent two years interviewing students, teachers, and administrators at failing public schools, alternative programs, charter schools, elite schools, and a variety of after-school programs. He also interviewed psychologists, economists, and neuroscientists and examined the latest research on character education beyond the bromides of the Left and Right to discover what actually works in teaching children skills that will aid them in school and in life, whatever the circumstances of their childhoods. Most compelling are Tough’s portraits of adolescents from backgrounds rife with poverty, violence, drug-addicted parents, sexual abuse, and failing schools, who manage to gain skills that help them overcome their adversities and go on to college. Tough ultimately argues in favor of research indicating that these important skills can be learned and children’s lives saved. A very hopeful look at promising new research on education. --Vanessa Bush



A Joosr Guide To How Children Succeed by Paul Tough

A Joosr Guide To    How Children Succeed by Paul Tough Author Bokish Ltd
ISBN-10 1785670727
Release 2015
Pages 24
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In today's fast-paced world, it's tough to find the time to read. But with Joosr guides, you can get the key insights from bestselling non-fiction titles in less than 20 minutes. Whether you want to gain knowledge on the go or find the books you'll love, Joosr's brief and accessible eBook summaries fit into your life. Find out more at joosr.com. There is plenty of focus on IQ as a good indicator for how successful a child will be in the future? But a child's character is just as key in determining how they will develop into adults. Find out why and how positive attributes can be developed. How Children Succeed gives you a look into the role that character plays in the future life of a child. Character is defined as curiosity, self-control, and grit, and up until now it has been largely disregarded as a factor that needed to be cultivated. But cognitive ability alone does not ensure future success; children need to face the challenges of life with the right mindset. You will learn: ℗ʺ What schools can do to teach positive character traits alongside academic material ℗ʺ Why it is important for you to let your child fail ℗ʺ How excessive stress can stunt your child's potential.



Helping Children Succeed

Helping Children Succeed Author Paul Tough
ISBN-10 9781473538368
Release 2016-05-26
Pages 144
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In his international bestseller How Children Succeed, Paul Tough introduced us to research showing that personal qualities like perseverance, self-control and conscientiousness play a critical role in children’s success. Now, in Helping Children Succeed, he outlines the practical steps that adults – from parents and teachers to policymakers and philanthropists – can take to improve the chances of every child, however adverse their circumstances. And he mines the latest research in psychology and neuroscience to show how creating the right environments, both at home and at school, can instil personal qualities vital for future success.



How Children Succeed Tough Highly Effective Great Habits for Raising Successful Children Healthy Habits Bringing Up Girls Loving Boys Teaching Strong Character

How Children Succeed Tough  Highly Effective Great Habits for Raising Successful Children Healthy Habits  Bringing Up Girls  Loving Boys  Teaching Strong Character Author Cathy Wilson
ISBN-10 9781312965034
Release 2015-03-03
Pages
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How Children Succeed Tough: Highly Effective Great Habits for Raising Successful Children has your SOLUTIONS and MINDSET needed to raise children! Worried your child doesn't have many friends? Are you wondering how to encourage your child to set goals and succeed? Do you wish you had a better connection with your child? Are you worried that your child isn't developing normally? Then this book is for you! Unfortunately, children don't come with a manual. So you need books like this one to help guide and support you raising your child positively. By using proven strategies and openly connecting with your child you WILL prepare them better for life! How Children Succeed Tough: Highly Effective Great Habits for Raising Successful Children has your ANSWERS. Download it today and let's get started!strong>



How Children Succeed

How Children Succeed Author Cathy Wilson
ISBN-10 1503262170
Release 2014-11-16
Pages 80
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How Children Succeed - Raising Successful Children by Best Selling Health and Wellness Author Cathy Wilson, introduces parenting strategies essential for healthy child growth and development! Wilson shows you how to set your child up for success. Building a solid life platform that teaches your child to become successful. SNEAK PEAK INSIDE... *SCHOOL influence in raising happy children *FAMILY relations building confidence in children *NUTRITION to reverse childhood obesity *EXERCISE build self esteem in children *LIFESTYLE teaching children values *LIFE CHANGES that build confidence in children SOME TOOLS TO PAVE A POSITIVE PATH FOR YOUR CHILD... *POSITIVE ATTITUDE *PERSISTENCE *DEALING WITH LIFE SETBACKS Your responsibility is to show your child how to BELIEVE, SET GOALS, and MAKE THEM REALITY! How Children Succeed: Raising Successful Children is your first step in setting your child up for success!



Top Secret What 100 Brave Critics Say about How Children Succeed

Top Secret  What 100 Brave Critics Say about How Children Succeed Author Lucas Stott
ISBN-10 551700136X
Release 2013-02
Pages 44
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In this book, we have hand-picked the most sophisticated, unanticipated, absorbing (if not at times crackpot!), original and musing book reviews of "How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character." Don't say we didn't warn you: these reviews are known to shock with their unconventionality or intimacy. Some may be startled by their biting sincerity; others may be spellbound by their unbridled flights of fantasy. Don't buy this book if: 1. You don't have nerves of steel. 2. You expect to get pregnant in the next five minutes. 3. You've heard it all.



How Children Succeed

How Children Succeed Author Nicole Townsend
ISBN-10 1482062003
Release 2013-01-23
Pages 64
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How Children Succeed: Life Lessons, Role Models, Creating the Road Ahead uncovers remarkable techniques for raising children to succeed. Every parent has a strong desire to have their children succeed. Raising successful children is crucial to them becoming outstanding human beings throughout their adolescent and adult lives. Nicole Townsend covers in great detail what every parent needs to know in order to produce positive results. Successful parenting comes from implementing important life lessons learned in this guide. * What is true success? * What must you specifically teach a child? * Prepare your child for the future, but how? * What three things are important to show your child? * How can you be a true role model? * Academics are an important building block for successful children, but what other child developments are required? Townsend reveals the answers that you need to accomplish these tasks. If you want to be a successful parent, then don't pass up this opportunity. Successful children come from successful parenting.



Wie kleine Kinder schlau werden

Wie kleine Kinder schlau werden Author John Caldwell Holt
ISBN-10 3407228554
Release 2003
Pages 232
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Ausgehend von der Beobachtung des kindlichen Spielens erläutert der Autor, wie Kinder denken und lernen.



In Dewey s Footsteps

In Dewey s Footsteps Author Katharine L. Sanderson
ISBN-10 OCLC:31091460
Release 1994
Pages 62
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In Dewey s Footsteps has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from In Dewey s Footsteps also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full In Dewey s Footsteps book for free.



Selbstbild

Selbstbild Author Carol Dweck
ISBN-10 9783492972826
Release 2016-05-02
Pages 304
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Spitzensportler, Geigenvirtuosen, Elitestudenten, Karrieremenschen – in der Regel sprechen wir Erfolge den Begabungen des Menschen zu. Doch dieser Glaube ist nicht nur falsch, er hindert auch unser persönliches Fortkommen und schränkt unser Potenzial ein. Die Psychologin Carol Dweck beweist: Entscheidend für die Entwicklung eines Menschen ist nicht das Talent, sondern das eigene Selbstbild. Was es damit auf sich hat, wie Ihr eigenes Selbstbild aussieht und wie Sie diese Erkenntnisse für sich persönlich nutzen können, erfahren Sie in diesem Buch.



Alle Menschen sind gleich erfolgreiche nicht

Alle Menschen sind gleich   erfolgreiche nicht Author Amy Chua
ISBN-10 9783593501178
Release 2014-03-01
Pages 318
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Warum sind Einwanderer aus China und dem Iran Gewinnertypen und die aus anderen Nationen oft nicht? »Tigermutter« Amy Chua und ihr Mann Jed Rubenfeld haben eine überraschende Antwort. Erfolg hat, wer drei Dinge mit auf den Weg bekommt: das Gefühl kollektiver Überlegenheit, gepaart mit einer tiefen Unsicherheit gegenüber der neuen Gesellschaft und nicht zuletzt einer guten Portion Selbstdisziplin. Das Gute: Das Erfolgsprinzip ist kulturell geprägt, aber dennoch übertragbar und kann uns auch hierzulande eine Lehre sein. Vorausgesetzt, wir haben den nötigen Biss!



Achieving Success with Impossible Children

Achieving Success with Impossible Children Author Dave Ziegler
ISBN-10 9780966657296
Release 2005-01-01
Pages 354
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Presents advice for both parents and therapist on ways to work with children in a variety of settings.



Mexican Roots American Schools

Mexican Roots  American Schools Author Robert Crosnoe
ISBN-10 080475523X
Release 2006
Pages 168
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Improving the educational success of the children of Mexican immigrants is crucial to the future prospects of these children as well as to the American population at large. This book documents how various aspects of these children's lives help or hinder their learning in elementary school.



Family Learning

Family Learning Author William F. Russell
ISBN-10 9780988857018
Release 2013-02-14
Pages 364
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The whole concept that author and educator William F. Russell, Ed.D., calls “Family Learning” centers on the fact that children spend only 13% of their waking hours between birth and age 18 in school. What sense does it make to confine all their learning to that narrow sliver of life? Family Learning: How to Help Your Children Succeed in School by Learning at Home offers practical, simple activities that parents can do with their children (grades K-8) to help them understand school concepts by using them in real-world applications. These “learning adventures,” as Dr. Russell calls them, can be done in the kitchen, in the backyard, in the car, on weekends, on holidays, on vacations—wherever and whenever parents and children can find joy in discovering a new piece of learning together. Through these family-centered, out-of-school learning activities, children understand that opportunities for learning are all around them, all the time, no matter where they live or what they happen to be studying in school at the time. Parents can play a powerful role in encouraging this “learning attitude,” which will benefit their children both in school and in life. And it is this attitude toward continual learning that children will take with them into their adult lives, into their careers, and into the families that they themselves create. “Family Learning” is an idea that can become a part of every family, no matter what the family’s income or educational level may be. Decades of clear and consistent research have shown that the activities that are customary in everyday family life are the surest predictor of a child’s success in school. Dr. Russell’s Family Learning book provides parents with a way to begin playing a more-active role in their children’s learning by using whatever time they have available to share fun, time-tested activities that are geared specifically to their child’s interest and level of learning. “What I call ‘Family Learning,’” Dr. Russell explains, “is not just school work at home, but rather, an enjoyable way for families to grow together, as parents and children each grow individually.” Family Learning: How to Help Your Children Succeed in School by Learning at Home identifies hundreds of library books (all with Dewey classifications) and other free or inexpensive learning resources, and it provides over a hundred web links to videos that help parents explain and demonstrate concepts in all school subjects including character development. Family Learning also provides a model that parents, teachers, and community leaders can use to expand learning opportunities—and learning in general—throughout any school district or community.